Blog

March 13, 2019

As you work your way through a training plan, your mileage and intensity build over a course of weeks. If you are training properly, your plan will start with relatively light effort and modest distances a few months from race day. As the weeks pass, your mileage and intensity levels will build, peak, and then taper.

Your total weekly mileage is your training volume. Your total weekly mileage and intensity together are your training load. Your overall goal is to gradually increase training load, with regular “step down” weeks for recovery, until you are about a month out from your target race. This is known as the “peak” of training, when your volume and intensity – your training load - are at the highest points of your training cycle. In other words, your mileage and intensity both “peak.” After that, you taper to race day.

There is no “magical point,” like a specific day, where your training load should peak. Instead, it is a period, generally about a month away from your race, where you are running more miles and with more focused intensity than at any other time in your training cycle. This is your “peak period,” not a “peak point.” Accordingly, you should think of your “peak” in terms of weeks, not a single point.

Keep in mind that the peak period is not the point at which your performance should “peak.” Ultimately, you want your performance to peak on race day. Your training plan should still contain high intensity, like pace work and speed work, inside the final weeks of training. You do want to give yourself more rest by lowering your volume, but you should maintain your speed and high-level performance as you approach race day. If all goes according to plan, the lower mileage during the taper will leave you feeling more rested, but the continuing intensity will have you feeling fast and ready for race day.

If you are uncertain about how to structure a training plan for your half-marathon or marathon, consider working with an experienced coach who can guide you through training. Your coach will help you find the proper volume, load, buildup, peak, and taper for your race.

 

Paul Carmona is the Online REVEL Coach who has designed training plans specifically for REVEL downhill courses. He is a 20-time REVEL Marathon Finisher and has run multiple Boston Qualifiers on every REVEL course that he has run, with his current streak at 18 BQs in a row at REVEL marathons!

Feb. 7, 2019
The Run Down - REVEL Race Series Newsletter Feb 2019

REVEL Kulia Course Preview

REVEL Kulia

A course strategy – and overall race strategy – is a must for optimal performance on race day. Whether this is your first REVEL race and your goal is simply to finish, or you are REVEL veteran aiming for a PR or BQ, you should have a well-planned strategy for how you intend to manage the REVEL Kulia course! The head coach of REVEL’s Online Coaching Program, who has run a Boston Qualifier in all the REVEL marathons, has prepared a detailed description of the Kulia Marathon and Half-Marathon courses.

Read Mode

Kulia & Mt Charleston Price Increases

Mt Charleston

REVEL Kulia & Mt Charleston have price increases coming up on Feb 12. The Mt Charleston Half Marathon still has spots but the Marathon is SOLD OUT. You can still join the marathon by purchasing one of the limited Charity Bibs for $249 (space is limited). Kulia is our new Hawaii event and has the most elevation drop of any REVEL course. Mt Charleston increases $10 and Kulia increases $15, so be sure to sign up now!

We're Hiring!

We're Hiring

As we continue to grow, we need more help! We're currently seeking a Graphic Designer and Race Director/Event Expansion Specialist. Both positions are full-time and based in our offices in Pleasant Grove, UT. For full details and to apply, please checkout the official Job Postings.

LAUNCH TEAM TRAINING STARTS

Launch Team

The Launch Team youth training for REVEL Mt Charleston starts this week in Las Vegas and Salt Lake. Sign your youth up now! Launch Team has trained hunderds of youth of all ages and athletic abilities to complete REVEL half marathons. If you think your kids can't handle it, they are tougher than you think! Altra, Hoka, Sketchers, and New Balance have donated shoes and Aftershokz has donated Bluetooth headphones that will be given to the first youth to signup (while sizes remain).

Learn more at https://thelaunchteam.org.

Things To Do - BIG BEAR

Big Bear Skiing

Whether you're in the mood to ski, snowboard or snow tube, Big Bear Mountain Resort is the place for you this winter. Enjoy bluebird days and the best snow conditions in Southern California.

 

Race Calendar

Mar. 9, 2019 REVEL Kulia
Big Island, Hawaii

Price Increase Feb 12!

Apr. 27, 2019 REVEL Mt Charleston
Las Vegas, NV

Price Increase Feb 12!

Jun. 2, 2019 REVEL Rockies
Denver, CO
Jun. 29, 2019 REVEL Mt Hood
Portland, OR
Aug. 17, 2019 REVEL Chilliwack
British Columbia, Canada
Sep. 14, 2019 REVEL Big Cottonwood
Salt Lake City, UT
Nov. 2, 2019 REVEL Mt Lemmon
Tucson, AZ
 Nov. 9, 2019 REVEL Big Bear (replaced Canyon City)
SoCal

Charity Donation Highlight

American Cancer Society

REVEL Kulia is proud to partner with another amazing group: American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society is dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service. Keep your eyes out for the Hawaii Chapter who is bringing their Aloha spirit to the Aid Stations on course!

Mother/Daughter Running Duo

Jacquie and Cam

Jacquie and Cam were awarded the Guinness World Record for running the most marathons run together by a parent and child, 120 and counting! At 66, Jacquie ran the 2018 Big Cottonwood Marathon and placed first in her age group while Cam had a PR at 3:33 with 3:30 on her horizon for a spot in the Boston Marathon. Congratulations you two! Keep up the good work.

Aftershokz

Aftershokz

AfterShokz headphones are unlike any other brand. They don’t nest inside your ears and they don’t cover your ears. They don't even play music the same way your other headphones do. AfterShokz uses bone conduction technology headphones and an open-ear design that allows you to take in all that pushes you, from your motivational playlists to the crowds cheering at the finish line. It’s time to remove the earbuds and take in all that drives you with AfterShokz. Save $50 on the Adventure Bundles by using code REVEL at checkout.

Random Race Entry Winner

Random Winner

Congratulations to Nancy Young who ran the 2018 REVEL Big Bear Marathon. She was randomly selected as the winner of a FREE race entry to any 2019 REVEL event. Keep your eyes out each month to see if you're the next random winner. Nancy, email revel@runrevel.com to claim your prize.

 

Feb. 5, 2019

A course strategy – and overall race strategy – is a must for optimal performance on race day. Whether this is your first REVEL race and your goal is simply to finish, or you are REVEL veteran aiming for a PR or BQ, you should have a well-planned strategy for how you intend to manage the REVEL Kulia course!

The head coach of REVEL’s Online Coaching Program, who has run a Boston Qualifier in all the REVEL marathons, has prepared a detailed description of the Kulia Marathon and Half-Marathon courses.

Managing the Course Based On Segments
A critical component of your race strategy is the course profile itself. Where are the sharp descents? Where are the climbs? Where does the course “flatten” a bit?

You want to plan your race with course segments in mind, and with an overall strategy for varying paces throughout. Your varied paces will be dictated by the elevation losses and gains, and you want to know before the race where those variations will occur.

Generally, the Kulia Marathon course can be divided into five sections:

Miles 1-2: Warm Up
Miles 3-9: Accelerate Part 1
Miles 10-15: Hang on
Miles 16-20: Accelerate Part 2
Miles 21-26.2: Cruise to the Finish

Similarly, the Kulia Half-Marathon course can be divided into four sections:

Miles 1-2: Gently Fast Start
Miles 3-8: PR Territory
Miles 9-10: Short Slowdown
Miles 11-13.1: Final 5K Kick

You can study the courses yourself on the REVEL website. You can zoom in, use the interactive elevation chart, and get a feel for what lays ahead of you on race day.

If possible, you should drive the course before race day to get a feel for what the segments look and feel like. Knowing what to expect, and when, is helpful when preparing your course strategy.

The marathon and half-marathon courses are summarized below based on the segments described above.


The Marathon Course

Miles 1-2: The Warm Up

Starting at almost 5,700’ elevation, the marathon starts near the Kilohana Hunter Checking Station on the western slopes of Mauna Kea. The first 10 miles of the course generally trend north/northwest, which means that the rising sun will be mostly at your back.

The first two miles of the course lose just over 300' of total elevation (grade of -2.9%), making this a perfect gradual downhill warm up for the marathon. The very minor climbs in these first two miles are insignificant compared to the gentle downhill slope that you will enjoy at the start of the race. With the average loss of around 150', the downhill grade of this section is a great way to start the race: not extremely fast, but fast enough to get your legs moving right away. Resist the urge to push your pace hard in these first two miles. There is a lot of downhill ahead, and you want to manage the early downhills by easing into your pace, settling in for the long haul, and letting gravity pull you along at a comfortably fast pace.

Miles 3-9: Accelerate Part 1

Just past mile 2, the course starts heading into some notably sharp downhills. Miles 3-9 all lose well over 300' per mile, with the average loss in this segment at 369' per mile. That is an average of -7% grade.

You want to accelerate as you pass mile 2, and work hard to hold that pace all the way to mile 9. Resist the natural tendency to chase people ahead of you or passing you. Although you want to take advantage of gravity throughout this course by running “faster than normal” on the downhills, you should not feel as if you are running “too hard” or “too fast.” If you do, then you should ease back a bit and aim for a “comfortably hard” pace.

Miles 10-15: Hang on

When you pass the mile 9 marker and begin mile 10, you will have lost almost 2,900’ of elevation since the start of the marathon. That is 52% of the total elevation loss of the course, but only about one-third of the total distance of the race. Although there is still a significant amount of downhill remaining in the final 17 miles (more than 2,600' of loss), the first real challenge of this course will be holding onto your goal pace for miles 10-15 on legs that have worked hard over the first 9 miles.

Mile 10 actually loses the same elevation (-184') as mile 2. However, that 2nd mile was run on fresh legs, and the 10th mile might feel a lot more challenging. One important mental note to make here is that after mile 10, the course makes the first of only two hard turns on the entire course. After running on Saddle Road for the first 10 miles, you will make a hard left turn, heading south/southwest on Mamalahoa Highway. Not only does the elevation make a noticeable change, but you literally change directions.

Miles 11 and 12 together lose just over 30'. Essentially, this is a totally flat section. Mile 13 actually gains 51' overall. As you approach the halfway mark of the course, the slowdown you experience will simply mean that gravity is no longer assisting you very much (for the moment). Miles 14 and 15 together lose just over 140' of elevation, but you should start to feel gravity helping you again as you approach mile 15. That is where you want to starting thinking about a second surge of acceleration ahead.


Miles 16-20: Accelerate Part 2
Two important things happen as you approach mile 15. First, you make only the second hard turn of the course, which mentally is always helpful when running through a tough stretch. Second, you begin the next hard descent towards the finish: miles 16-20 lose 1,310' overall. Although those aren't the kind of whopping downhills you saw in miles 3-9, this section loses an average of 262' per mile, which is a -5% grade. Generally, you should find it easy to accelerate to a pace that is similar to what you maintained from miles 2-9. You might not be quite as fast as earlier miles, but the more gradual downhill of this section will make it easier to sustain your goal pace, or faster than goal pace, all the way to mile 20.

Miles 21-26.2: Cruise to the Finish

The last 10K of the marathon course is a continuation of the long, sustained downhill section that began way back at mile 15. Even better, the downhill in the closing 6.2 miles is less severe than the earlier segments, which is easier on tired legs.

The final 6.2 miles of the course lose 1,033’, or an average of roughly 166’ per mile. This is a comfortable downhill section of -3.2% grade, and you should be able to sustain your goal pace throughout the final 10K.

Summary of the Marathon Course

The REVEL Kulia Marathon course loses 5,548' overall, more than a mile of elevation from start to finish. Over the 26.2-mile course, you likely will surprise yourself with your speed on the downhill segments. Although it is generally true that you never want to run “too fast" at any point in a marathon, remember that gravity is your friend, and you want to take advantage of the benefits of downhill running. In that regard, it makes sense to run as fast as you can comfortably run on the downhills, hold on during the middle flats and climbs, and then turn on the acceleration again for the final 11+ miles.


The Half-Marathon Course


Miles 1-2: Gently Fast Start

Starting at 2,664’ of elevation, the course drops about 200' from the start to mile 2. That is a comfortable and manageable descent for your first two miles.

You will need to resist the urge to chase people as they pass you. While you want to take advantage of gravity throughout this course by running “faster than normal” on the downhills, you need to manage the downhill drops by easing into your pace, settling in for the long haul, and letting gravity pull you along at a comfortably fast pace. You should not feel as if you are running “too fast.” If you do, then you should ease back a bit and aim for a “comfortably hard” pace.

Miles 3-8: PR Territory

Miles 3-8 lose 1,440’ of elevation, which is an average of 240’ per mile. This is a series of very fast downhill miles averaging -4.5% grade, and the segment is where your half-marathon personal record (PR) will be made. Don’t be surprised to see that you have picked up significant speed and are running well ahead of your goal pace. At the same time, if you feel out of control, or if you feel yourself working “too hard” while running downhill, then slow down.

Miles 9-10: Short Slowdown

Mile 8 to mile 9 actually drops 144' overall, but there is a climb of about 35' that starts as you approach the 9-mile mark. After that, mile 10 drops only 65', which is the lowest amount of elevation loss since the first mile of the race.

You can expect a short slowdown in this two-mile segment due to the short climbs and flatter terrain. You will need to “switch gears” to a slower pace based on even effort, and should be prepared to run slightly slower than your goal pace on the uphill segments. Also, you really do not want to concern yourself with runners passing you if that happens. It is easy in a race to get caught up with the pace of other runners. Remember, you have some downhill miles ahead where you can expect to speed up significantly to finish the race, and you want to conserve your energy for the finish. If you feel yourself working too hard in this sections, then simply lower your overall effort.

Miles 11-13.1: Final 5K Kick

The final 3.1 miles of the course are similar to the long, sustained downhill section from miles 2-8. Even better, the downhill in the closing 5K is less severe than the earlier segments, which is easier on tired legs. Overall, this section drops 655’, or an average of roughly 211’ per mile. This is a comfortable downhill grade of -4%, and you should have no problem sustaining your goal pace throughout the final 5K. The last mile - which is always challenging in any race - takes a "final dive" towards the coast, losing 282'. The final .1 loses 34' of elevation, which allows for a strong final kick.

Summary of the Half-Marathon Course

The REVEL Kulia Half-Marathon course loses more than 2,500’ of elevation from start to finish. With an average loss of more than 191' per mile (a grade of -3.6%), this one of the fastest half-marathon courses you will ever run. Over the 13.1-mile course, you likely will surprise yourself with your "faster than normal" pace on the downhill segments.

Paul Carmona

Paul Carmona is the Online REVEL Coach who has designed training plans specifically for REVEL downhill courses. He is a 20-time REVEL Marathon Finisher and has run multiple Boston Qualifiers on every REVEL course that he has run, with his current streak at 18 BQs in a row at REVEL marathons!

Dec. 20, 2018
The Run Down - REVEL Race Series Newsletter Dec 2018

Kulia, Rockies, & Mt Hood Price Increases

Rockies

REVEL Kulia, Rockies, & Mt Hood are all ringing in the new year with a price increase. The best way to make sure you stick with those New Year's resolutions is to sign up for a race! Kulia is our new Hawaii event and has the most elevation drop of any REVEL course. Rockies is in Denver and has a strong downhill finish along with the most diverse scenery of any REVEL course. Mt Hood is in Portland and has the perfect weather for running in the summer, not to mention one of the highest BQ rates of any race in the country. All these have a $10 price increase on Jan 1 so make sure to sign up  now! 

Seeking Volunteer YOUTH Coaches

Launch Team

The Launch Team is seeking volunteer coaches and youth participants in Salt Lake and Las Vegas to train for the REVEL Mt Charleston Half Marathon. Groups meet twice a week starting in February for training. Launch Team's mission is to get youth of all abilities off the couch and out running. Parents can also sign up and join their youth in training and at the race. Parents do not need to run the same pace as their youth. Altra, Hoka, Sketchers, and New Balance have donated shoes and Aftershokz has donated Bluetooth headphones that will be given to the first youth to signup (while sizes remain).

Learn more at https://thelaunchteam.org.

 

Things To Do - Chilliwack

Seven Sisters

Seven Sisters Trail is a relatively short, easy hike that can be fun for the family. It's 3km (2 miles) in distance and has an elevation gain of just 70 feet (23m). It’s a beautiful hike in the Cultus Lake area, leading to a grove of old douglas fir trees. Chilliwack is the PERFECT place to plan your summer vacation with the family in 2019. 

 

Race Calendar

Mar. 9, 2019 REVEL Kulia
Big Island, Hawaii

Price Increase Jan 1, 2019!

Apr. 27, 2019 REVEL Mt Charleston
Las Vegas, NV
Jun. 2, 2019 REVEL Rockies
Denver, CO

Price Increase Jan 1, 2019!

Jun. 29, 2019 REVEL Mt Hood
Portland, OR

Price Increase Jan 1, 2019!

Aug. 17, 2019 REVEL Chilliwack
British Columbia, Canada
Sep. 14, 2019 REVEL Big Cottonwood
Salt Lake City, UT
Nov. 2, 2019 REVEL Mt Lemmon
Tucson, AZ
 Nov. 9, 2019 REVEL Big Bear (replaced Canyon City)
SoCal

Intermountain Healthcare

Intermountain Healthcarel

Running with proper technique makes runners more efficient meaning you can run longer, faster and safer. TOSH Orthopedics has four tips to help with your technique. More tips to follow in upcoming newsletters. 1. Stride angle, the angle formed by your thighs at toe off. This angle should be as wide and large as possible. Improved stride angle is accomplished through two key modifications; rear leg extension and a higher knee drive in the front leg. Both motions require strength and range of motion in the hips. Read More...

home for the holidays

Richelin

Richelin signed up for the REVEL Big Bear Half Marathon as a countdown for
the end of her husband's deployment. Twenty minutes before the race began,
she got a text that he boarded his flight out of Afghanistan. The race was
symbolic of the past eight months, the struggle, the growth, and the triumph
of finishing. We thank Richelin's husband for his service and congraulate her
on crossing the finish line!

REVEL Mt Lemmon Winners

REVEL Mt Lemmon was held on November 3, 2018 in Tucson, AZ. Here are all the winners:

Brent Bailey
Male Marathon Winner
Brent Bailey
2:33:43
Laurie Blankenship
Female Marathon Winner
Laurie Blankenship
2:57:50
Daniel Crane
Male Half Winner
Daniel Crane
1:13:27
Lauren Reasoner
Female Half Winner
Lauren Reasoner
1:16:11

Half Team Winner
Volte
1:29:58

Marathon Team Winner
Keep It Moving
3:19:36

Random Race Entry Winner

Random Winner

Congratulations to Taylor Edwards who ran the 2018 REVEL Big Cottonwood Marathon. He was randomly selected as the winner of a FREE race entry to any 2019 REVEL event. Keep your eyes out each month to see if you're the next random winner. Taylor, email revel@runrevel.com to claim your prize.

 
 
 
Dec. 15, 2018
Launch Team HeaderLaunch Team Kids
Launch Team Kids

The Launch Team is seeking volunteer coaches and youth participants to train for the REVEL Mt Charleston Half Marathon in Salt Lake and Las Vegas. Groups meet twice a week starting in February for training.

Launch Team's mission is to get youth of all abilities off the couch and out running.

Parents can also sign up and join their youth at training and at the race. Parents do not need to run the same pace as their youth.

Altra, Hoka, Sketchers, and New Balance have donated shoes and Aftershokz has donated Bluetooth headphones that will be given to the first youth to signup (while sizes remain). 

Learn more at:

TheLaunchTeam.org

 

Volunteer Coaches Needed

Launch Team is also seeking volunteer coaches. Coaches get a free entry to the REVEL Mt Charleston Half Marathon. Apply to be a volunteer coach at:

Coaching Application

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