Blog

Sept. 9, 2018
REVEL Big Cottonwood

REVEL Big Cottonwood is excited to announce the 2019 event will be taking place on Saturday, September 14.

Save up to $15 when you sign up by September 26. Use $10-off code GOBIG at checkout along with the $5 team discount to redeem your savings!

Register for REVEL Big Cottonwood

 

Aug. 29, 2018

Mike Peterson

Dear REVEL Big Cottonwood Runners,

On behalf of our City, I welcome you to Cottonwood Heights. We are thrilled that our beautiful and vibrant community will once again play host to this world-class event. Your experience here is sure to be among the best of all races you have run.

Incorporated in 2005, Cottonwood Heights has quickly become known as a progressive community and a very desirable place to live and visit.  Soon after our incorporation as a city, Money Magazine recognized us as one of the 100 most desirable places to live for a city our size in the United States.  We are proud partners of the REVEL Big Cottonwood Marathon and Half as it provides us an opportunity to showcase the beauty and uniqueness of our thriving community.  

Much like the race you are about to run, our City prides itself on offering top tier services to our residents and visitors. We are home to more than 1,500 businesses, several of which are among the Fortune 500. I encourage you to patronize these businesses as much as possible during your visit. When choosing your restaurants, entertainment, and other purchases, please consider selecting from among the myriad options available to you right here in Cottonwood Heights.

I wish you the best of luck in your upcoming race and hope that you will enjoy your visit to our City as much as we enjoy hosting you and your supporters.

Sincerely,

Mayor Michael J. Peterson   

Aug. 3, 2018
The Run Down - REVEL Race Series Newsletter August 2018

Big Cottonwood Course Preview

Big Cottonwood Course Preview

A course strategy and overall race strategy is a must for optimal performance on race day. You should have a well-planned strategy for how you intend to manage the course!

A critical component of your strategy is the course profile itself. Where are the sharp descents? Where are the climbs? Where does the course “flatten” a bit? You want to plan your race with course segments in mind and with an overall strategy for varying paces throughout. Your varied paces will be dictated by the elevation losses and gains, and you want to know before the race where those variations will occur.

Read More

 

Big Cottonwood Price Increase

Big Cottonwood

REVEL Big Cottonwood in Salt Lake has a $10 price increase on August 7. Sign up now to save! REVEL Big Cottonwood was the original and still the largest REVEL event. It is a must-do. Big Cottonwood Canyon is spectacular!

Register for Big Cottonwood

 

Big Bear Expo Location

Big Bear Expo

The REVEL Big Bear Expo will be held at Sylvan Park (NW corner at University St & Colton Ave): 601 N University St, Redlands, CA 92374. The expo will be on Saturday, October 13 from 10:00am-6:00pm.

 

 

Big Bear Training Group

Big Bear Training

Are you currently training for REVEL Big Bear? Don't train alone and join the FREE in-person Pasadena Pacers training program. All abilities are welcome!

Sign up today

 

REVEL Mt Hood Winners

REVEL Mt Hood was held on July 28, 2018 near Portland, OR. Here are all your winners.

Gary Krugger
Male Marathon Winner
Gary Krugger
2:36:56.86
Sylvanna Toledo
Female Marathon Winner
Sylvanna Toledo
3:00:13.06
Connor Peloquin
Male Half Winner
Connor Peloquin
1:09:30.45
Corrine Murray
Female Half Winner
Corrine Murray
1:25:29.12

Half Team Winner
Orange Crush
1:15:37

Marathon Team Winner
Hasbeens & Nevergunnabees
3:04:57

Race Calendar

Sep. 8, 2018 REVEL Big Cottonwood
Salt Lake City, UT

Price Increase Aug 7, 2018!

Oct. 14, 2018 REVEL Big Bear (replacing Canyon City)
SoCal
Nov. 3, 2018 REVEL Mt Lemmon
Tucson, AZ
Apr. 27, 2019 REVEL Mt Charleston
Las Vegas, NV
Jun. 2, 2019 REVEL Rockies
Denver, CO
TBA 2019 REVEL Mt Hood
Portland, OR

HOKA ONE ONE

HOKA ONE ONE

HOKA ONE ONE is excited to be partnering with REVEL Big Cottonwood for a sixth year! Be sure to stop by their expo booth to pick up your next pair of HOKA ONE ONE shoes.

SCHEELS

Scheels

The Scheels located in Sandy Utah is a great place to pick up your new running gear and much more. Be sure to stop by their expo booth at Big Cottonwood and say hello to them at their aid station! Thanks Scheels!

The More You Know - Mt Lemmon

Mt Lemmon

Sitting at 9,150 feet, the Mount Lemmon Air Force Station was said to be the
world’s highest radar installation in 1957. It was manned by the 684th Aircraft
Control and Warning Squadron, whose motto was “Who goes there?” Along
with dozens of similar stations, it watched for Soviet aircraft before the
advent of satellite surveillance. 

Intermountain Alta View Hospital

Intermountain

Alta View Hospital is a great REVEL Big Cottonwood Sponsor. Be sure to thank their staff on course for keeping everyone safe and healthy at this years REVEL Big Cottonwood Marathon & Half.

Team Highlight

Marathon Maniacs

Check out the Marathon Maniacs & Half Fanatics, the running club that is crazy about running! 3 marathons or half marathons within 90 days to qualify. Do you have what it takes? Visit marathonmaniacs.com or halffanatics.com for more details.

HeadSweaets

HeadSweats

REVEL's exclusive headwear partner for 2018 is Headsweats. Headsweats is dedicated to providing the highest quality headwear in the industry using innovative materials and designs. Keep a cool head. Check your swag bag for this year's FREE REVEL HeadSweats Hat.

Charity Donation Highlight

Charity

Since 2012, REVEL has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to chairities aligned with our vision of fitness and stewdardship of our courses. Charities include Cottonwood Canyons Foundation, Brighton Institute, Drive Smart, Mt Lemmon Community Center, Mt Charleston Volunteer Fire Department, and Hoodland Fire. We strive to give back to those areas that are gracious enough to host our events.

Scott James Sport Jewelry Partner

Scott James Sport Jewelry

For 2018, REVEL Race Series has partnered with Scott James Sport Jewelry for all of our runners' jewelry needs. Scott James Sport Jewelry has over 300 running charms available, including location charms specific to most REVEL events! The leader in sport and running jewelry, all of their jewelry is cast in sterling silver and finished with a unique satin finish that's only available from Scott James. Whether shopping for yourself or a friend, stop by their booth at the next event to pick up your REVEL Race Series jewelry and a few running charms.

Random Race Entry Winner

Random Winner

Congratulations to Melissa Levy who ran the 2017 REVEL Canyon City Marathon. She was randomly selected as the winner of a FREE race entry to any 2018/2019 REVEL event. Keep your eyes out each month to see if you're the next random winner. Melinda, email revel@runrevel.com to claim your prize.

 
 
Aug. 3, 2018

A course strategy – and overall race strategy – is a must for optimal performance on race day. Whether this is your first REVEL Big Cottonwood race and your goal is simply to finish, or you are Big Cottonwood veteran aiming for a PR or BQ, you should have a well-planned strategy for how you intend to manage the course!

The head coach of REVEL’s Online Coaching Program, who has run a Boston Qualifier in all of the REVEL marathons, has prepared a detailed description of the Big Cottonwood Marathon and Half-Marathon courses.

Managing the Course Based On Segments

A critical component of your strategy is the course profile itself. Where are the sharp descents? Where are the climbs? Where does the course “flatten” a bit?

You want to plan your race with course segments in mind, and with an overall strategy for varying paces throughout. Your varied paces will be dictated by the elevation losses and gains, and you want to know before the race where those variations will occur.

Generally, the Big Cottonwood Marathon course can be divided into five sections:

Miles 1-3: The Fast Start

Mile 4: The Loop

Miles 5-18: The Canyon Drop

Miles 19-23: The Out and Back

Miles 24-26.2: The Straightaway Finish

Similarly, the Big Cottonwood Half-Marathon course can be divided into four sections:

Miles 1-3: The Speedy Start

Miles 4-5: The Little Rollers

Miles 6-9: The Canyon Exit

Miles 10-13.1: The Straightaway Finish

You can study the courses yourself on the REVEL website. You can zoom in, use the interactive elevation chart, and get a feel for what lays ahead of you on race day.

If possible, you should drive the course before race day to get a feel for what the segments look and feel like. Knowing what to expect, and when, is helpful when preparing your course strategy.

The marathon and half-marathon courses are summarized below based on the segments described above.

The Marathon Course

Miles 1-3: The Fast Start

Starting at almost 9,700’ elevation, the first 3 miles of the course are on Guardsman Pass Road and include several turns and switchbacks. Overall, this first 3-mile segment loses nearly 1,100’ of elevation. That is a significant elevation loss, and you will want to manage the drops by easing into your pace, settling in for the long haul, and letting gravity pull you along at a comfortably fast pace.

Resist the urge to chase people as they pass you. While you want to take advantage of gravity, you should not feel as if you are running “too hard” or “too fast.” If you do, then you should ease back a bit and aim for a “comfortably hard” pace.

Mile 4: The Loop

You will leave Guardsman Pass Road where it intersects with Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, turn left, and start climbing towards the Brighton Resort where you will loop around the resort area, and then head back towards the point where you began the loop.

Over the course of The Loop, you will climb slightly more than 100’ to the highest point of the loop. This is a segment where you do not want to get caught up with the pace of other runners if they are passing you. You still have many, many miles to go, and you want to conserve your energy for the miles ahead. If you feel yourself working too hard, then simply slow down.

Miles 5-18: The Canyon Drop

From mile 4 to mile 18, just before you exit Big Cottonwood Canyon, you will experience the fastest part of the marathon course, with an elevation loss of more than 3,700’. There are a few small, short climbs here and there in this segment, but they are minor in comparison to the overall elevation loss.

Don’t be surprised if you find yourself running well ahead of your goal pace. This segment is where the downhill profile of the marathon course will benefit you significantly. At the same time, be wary of a sensation of “running too fast.” If you feel out of control, or if you feel yourself working “too hard” while running downhill, then slow down.

Miles 19-23: The Out and Back

Just past mile 18, you will leave Big Cottonwood Canyon Road and turn onto S. Wasatch Boulevard for an out-and-back segment. For the next 2.2 miles, the course flattens out a bit and loses less elevation that the previous miles coming down the canyon. All totaled, you will lose just over 90’ in the “out” portion of the out-and-back, with some climbs along the way.

After the turnaround, you will run 2.2 miles back to the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon and head towards Fort Union Boulevard. Over this 2.2-miles stretch, you will be climbing back to where you started the out-and-back.

During this segment, don’t panic or become discouraged if you find yourself slowing down, or if it suddenly feels harder to maintain your pace. After the significant drop of the early miles, along with the typical late-stage fatigue that is common in marathons, your legs might feel heavy and you might feel as if you are working very hard to keep going. But the key will be to keep going. Once you get past this segment, the closing miles will be downhill again.

Miles 24-26.2: The Straightaway Finish

The finish line is on Fort Union Boulevard. After the right-hand turn from the out-and-back onto Fort Union, the closing 3.6-mile segment drops approximately 470’ total, making it a gradual, straightaway downhill finish. You will encounter terrific crowds who will cheer you towards the finish line of the fast and beautiful Big Cottonwood Marathon!

Summary of the Marathon Course

The Big Cottonwood Marathon course loses almost a mile of elevation from start to finish. Over the 26.2-mile course, you likely will surprise yourself with your speed on the downhill segments. Although it is generally true that you never want to "go out too fast" in the opening miles of a marathon, remember that gravity is your friend, and you want to take advantage of the benefits of downhill running.

The Half-Marathon Course

Miles 1-3: The Speedy Start

Starting at almost 7,300’ elevation, the half-marathon course drops almost 400’ total from the start to mile 3. That is an average of about 133' per mile, which is a significant but manageable descent each mile. You will want to manage the early downhill drops by easing into your pace, settling in for the long haul, and letting gravity pull you along at a comfortably fast pace. You should not feel as if you are running “too hard” or “too fast.” If you do, then you should ease back a bit and aim for a “comfortably hard” pace.

Miles 4-5: The Little Rollers

The term "rollers" usually brings to mind rolling hills. That is not at all what you will face in this segment. Instead, you will find occasional dips and short climbs that occur in miles 4 and 5. Overall, you will drop a total of 611' in this segment, which averages more than 300’ per mile. Although you will almost certainly feel very fast on the downhills in this segment, you will want to slow down on the occasional climbs and conserve your energy for the miles ahead.

Miles 6-9: The Canyon Exit

At mile 5, where the "Little Rollers" are behind you, you will be at 6,275’ of elevation. At mile 9, just before you exit Big Cottonwood Canyon, the elevation is 5,033'. In other words, you will run 4 miles down the canyon and lose a net of 1,242’. That is more than 310’ per mile.

Be wary of a sensation of “running too fast.” If you feel out of control, or if you feel yourself working “too hard” while running downhill, then slow down. However, you will be “warmed up” by this point, and will want to take advantage of the favorable downhill miles.

Miles 10-13.1: The Straightaway Finish

Just past mile 9, you will leave Big Cottonwood Canyon Road and continue straight onto Fort Union Boulevard. At this point, you can say to yourself "now downhill to the finish!" From mile 9 to 10, you will lose about 160’ of elevation.

The final 3.1-mile segment, which is entirely on Fort Union Boulevard, drops approximately 425’ total, making it a gradual, straightaway downhill finish. In this final stretch, the crowds of spectators will grow larger as you make your way towards the finish line of the fast and beautiful Big Cottonwood Half-Marathon!

Summary of the Half-Marathon Course

The Big Cottonwood Half-Marathon course loses 2,856' of elevation from start to finish. That's an average of more than 218' per mile, making this one of the fastest half-marathon courses you will ever run. Over the 13.1-mile course, you likely will surprise yourself with your speed on the downhill segments.

Paul Carmona is the Online REVEL Coach who has designed training plans specifically for REVEL downhill courses. He is a 17-time REVEL Marathon Finisher and has run multiple Boston Qualifiers on every REVEL course that he has run, with his current streak at 15 BQs in a row at REVEL marathons!

July 5, 2018

Mt Hood

A course strategy – and overall race strategy – is a must for optimal performance on race day. Whether this is your first REVEL race and your goal is simply to finish, or you are veteran aiming for a PR or BQ, you should have a well-planned strategy for how you intend to manage the course!

The head coach of REVEL’s Online Coaching Program, who has run a Boston Qualifying time in all the REVEL marathons that he has run, has prepared detailed descriptions of the Revel Mt. Hood Marathon and Half-Marathon courses.

Managing the Course Based On Segments
A critical component of your strategy is the course profile itself. Where are the sharp descents? Where are the climbs? Where does the course “flatten” a bit?

You want to plan your race with course segments in mind, and with an overall strategy for varying paces throughout. Your varied paces will be dictated by the elevation losses and gains, and you want to know before the race where those variations will occur.

Generally, the Revel Mt. Hood Marathon course can be divided into five sections:

Miles 1-5: The “Ski Slopes” Fast Start
Miles 6-10: Settle In
Miles 11-15: Accelerate Past the Half
Miles 16-20: Flatten Out
Miles 21-26.2: Rolling Finish

Similarly, the Revel Mt. Hood Half-Marathon course can be divided into four sections:

Miles 1-4: Fast Four
Miles 5-8: Steady Four
Miles 9-12: Work Hard Four
Mile 13 (plus .1): Fast Finish – Final Kick

You can study the courses yourself on the REVEL Mt. Hood website. You can zoom in, use the interactive elevation chart, and get a feel for what lays ahead of you on race day.

If possible, you should drive the course before race day to get a feel for what the segments look and feel like. Knowing what to expect, and when, is helpful when preparing your course strategy.

The marathon and half-marathon courses are summarized below based on the segments described above.

THE MARATHON COURSE

Miles 1-5: The “Ski Slopes” Fast Start

Starting at 5,620’ elevation, the marathon starts adjacent to the ski lifts at The Timberline Lodge and Ski Area at the base of Mt. Hood. The first five miles of the marathon are almost entirely on the Timberline Highway, a smooth paved road that is nestled between tall pines and firs that line the road.

The first five miles of the marathon lose roughly 1,640' of elevation, with less than 20 total feet of climbing over that opening segment. These downhills are notably sharp, and you will want to take advantage of gravity by letting yourself move comfortably fast. Be wary of a sensation of “running too fast” in this entire stretch of the race. If you feel out of control, or if you feel yourself working “too hard” while running downhill, then slow down.

Miles 6-10: Settle In

Shortly before mile 5, the course turns from Timberline Highway onto U.S. 26. Over the next 5 miles, the course loses another 1,350’. This 5-mile segment is not as sharp as the opening segment, but still runs noticeably downhill. Like the opening 5 miles, this section is where you will want to take advantage of gravity and let your pace accelerate to the "comfortably fast" edge of your ability as you “settle in” at your goal pace, or slightly ahead of it.

Miles 11-15: Accelerate Past the Half

From mile 10 to mile 15, the course loses approximately 1,050’ of elevation. You will notice the more gradual descent, which is still significant, with each passing mile. At this stage of the race, with the sharpest descents behind you and the flatter miles ahead, you want to accelerate past the halfway mark. Miles 14 and 15 are two of the last miles where you will see elevation loss greater than 3% (more than 160’ per mile). Take advantage of these downhill miles as you approach the last 11 miles of the race.

Miles 16-20: Flatten Out

Overall, miles 16-20 lose about 360’ total, compared to earlier segments that lost 3-4 times that. These are much more gradual drops that what you encountered in the first 15 miles, and the key to this section is to maintain a steady pace that parallels the lower drop in elevation: lower drop means slower pace. You will notice a slowing of your pace, and that you cannot increase your pace without an increase in effort. This is due not only to the normal and expected fatigue at this point in a race, but also due to the lower amount of elevation loss per mile.

Miles 21-26.2: Rolling Finish

Make no mistake: this is where it gets tough for about 5 miles of the final 10K. All totaled, the final 10K of the course loses about 350’ of elevation. Miles 21 and 22 together lose a total of about 180' of elevation, and there are some noticeably sharp drops followed by gradual climbs. After that, miles 23 and 24 roll gradually up and then down to lose just over 120’ of elevation. Mile 25 actually gains 11’, and then mile 26 loses just under 60’. The final .2 is essentially flat.

Summary of the Marathon Course

The Revel Mt. Hood Marathon course loses over 4,750’ of elevation from start to finish. Over the 26.2-mile course, you likely will surprise yourself with your speed on the downhill segments. Although it is generally true that you never want to "go out too fast" in the opening miles of a marathon, remember that gravity is your friend, and you want to take advantage of the benefits of downhill running.

THE HALF-MARATHON COURSE

Miles 1-4: Fast Four

Starting at 1,759’ of elevation, the course drops roughly 440’ total from the start to mile 4. You will encounter a few gradual climbs in these opening miles, but nothing too severe. What you want to do at this early stage of the race is take advantage of the downhills, take it easy on the uphills. The downhill is noticeable but comfortable – not too steep, but just enough to let your legs turn over quickly. At the same time, be wary of a sensation of “running too fast.” If you feel out of control, or if you feel yourself working “too hard” while running downhill, then slow down.

Miles 5-8: Steady Four

You will notice the difference between miles 1-4, which average more than 100’ of elevation loss per mile, and miles 5-8, each of which drop between about 50' and 80' per mile. These are more gradual drops than what you encountered in the opening segment, so you will want to maintain a steady pace. There are no steep, fast drops, but also no hard climbs. As the course gradually drops, you want to maintain a steady level of effort to hold your pace.

Miles 9-12: Work Hard Four

Make no mistake: this is where it gets tough and where you will need to work hard. Miles 9 and 10 together lose a total of just over 50' of elevation. You don’t want to “push” yourself to try matching the fast pace that you held in the more downhill miles earlier in the race. Mile 11 will suddenly feel faster again. It loses over 70’ of elevation, and you will notice it. However, mile 12 requires some work: it gains more than 20’ overall.

Mile 13 (plus .1): Fast Finish – Final Kick

Once you reach mile 12, you can say to yourself "now downhill to the finish!" Even better, the downhill in the closing 1.1 miles is steady and gradual, but quite noticeable, which is great for tired legs. The elevation loss from mile 12 to the finish is roughly 70’. You should find yourself able to resume some of the faster paces that you were able to run in the earlier miles of the race.


Summary of the Half-Marathon Course

The Revel Mt. Hood Half-Marathon course loses nearly 900' of elevation from start to finish. That's an average of around 70' per mile, making this one of the fastest half-marathon courses you will ever run. Over the 13.1-mile course, you likely will surprise yourself with your speed on the downhill segments.

Paul Carmona is the Online REVEL Coach who has designed training plans specifically for REVEL downhill courses. He is a 16-time REVEL Marathon Finisher and has run multiple Boston Qualifiers on every REVEL course that he has run, with his current streak at 14 BQs in a row at REVEL marathons!

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